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ARTICLES ON WRITING

What Kind of Publisher are you Talking To?
A caution about vanity and subsidy publishers, from Lorraine Cobcroft

Five Plot Devices that hurt your writing
Submitted by Lesley 10/1/2013 (with a note that the host site features lots of helpful articles)

Reports vs. Stories

Repetition in Writing (contributed by Lorraine Cobcroft, Rainbowriter)

A Formula for a Successful Novel

Novel Types

Participial Phrases can Make Your or Break Your Fiction

ARTICLE ON USING FILTERS

"So what is a filter?

The most basic form of a filter is when the writer tells the reader that a characters sees, hears, smells, feels (as in the sense of touch), or tastes something. A related, and slightly more nuanced filter, is when the writer tells the reader that a character notices, realizes, recognizes, or feels (as in an emotion) something."

Read more-

USEFUL WRITING TIPS

http://dramaticapedia.com/contents/dramatica-theory-book
contains a wealth of useful hints for would-be novelists about how to build characters and weave a story successfully

WRITING THE BIG DRAMATIC MOMENT (SHOW ME...)

HELPFUL ARTICLES FOR WRITERS WHO STRUGGLE WITH THE RULES OF GRAMMAR

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/index.htm

SHOW DON'T TELL

""i combed through my manuscript, marking scenes I thought I could expand. By the time I’d finished reworking the first scene, the concept clicked. I finally understood what all the fuss was about. My writing had become cinematic, it had movement, my characters were three dimensional and I didn’t even have to mention their personality traits because I was showing them. But above all, my writing evoked emotion. This is what successful showing does. It uses the five senses (and sixth) to evoke an emotional response from your reader without telling them how you want them to feel. Simply put, does me saying Hilary felt scared make you feel scared? Of course not."

This quote was extracted from an article at http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/the-value-of-show-dont-tell-in-your-writing?et_mid=591006&rid=3080931 - a great article on how to show rather than telling.

The quote sums up the reason for showing rather than telling.  Showing puts your reader in a theatre, watching the action and responding emotionally to it – rather than on a bar stool listening to someone relate it.  Compare the emotion you feel seeing a bad car accident with just hearing someone talk about it.  Can you taste a wonderful dish just by hearing someone say ‘’The dinner was superb’’?  Compare that with walking side by side with someone into a restaurant and feeling the atmosphere and tasting the dinner that is served to them.   Showing brings it all to life.

A technique that might help anyone struggling with showing rather than telling is to rewrite scenes as script for a play or movie rather than as a story.  You have to write dialog, and insert instructions to actors about how and where to move, what facial expressions are needed, etc.  You are not allowed to tell anything. Everything must be revealed through movement, expression and dialog.  It might be a challenge, but it should definitely help you learn how to show not tell in your stories

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